AUTHORIZED TOURIST GUIDE SPECIALIZED IN ORGANIZATION OF TOUR, MEETING AND GUIDED VISITS IN ALL UMBRIA!

TOURIST GUIDE OF THE UMBRIA!

| Home | | Margherita | | My tours | | News| | Hotel Restaurant |

| Contacts |

 

ASSISE - BEVAGNA - MONTEFALCO - FOLIGNO - SPELLO - CORCIANO - TREVI - GUBBIO - CASCIA - NORCIA - PEROUSE - NARNI - TERNI - TUORO - CASTIGLIONE DEL LAGO - SPOLETO - DERUTA - GUALDO TADINO - CITTA'DI CASTELLO

Your professional service! TOURISTIC GROUPS SCHOOLS DISABLED FACILITIES INCENTIVE INDIVIDUALS LAST MINUTE

Discover the Umbria!

Séjour en Ombrie!

Hôtel Restaurant

 "Da Angelo"

UMBRIA HISTORY

Umbrian towns

First to occupy the region were the Umbrians, which gave it the name. This people, occupied a major part of Italy, but was then taken over by the Etruscans, who is said to have taken three hundred cities from the Umbrians. Soon, however, Umbrians and Etruscans had to unite in resisting the Romans, and the war outcome was uncertain for several years. The Umbrian resisted to the end, until the battle of Sentino, in 295 BC The power of Rome prevailed definitively. Thereafter the Umbrians were always allies of Rome, a test is the help that they offered when Hannibal crossed the Alps, defeated the Roman army at Lake Trasimeno and Cannae. Following Umbria was the scene of bloody struggles afflicting Rome that ended with the victory of Octavian over Antony. During the period of the Roman Empire, the region was embellished by great monuments like the Temple of Minerva, Assisi Amphitheater of Terni. However, the geographic location of Umbria, at the center of many roads, exposed them to the incursions of all invaders: Goths, Byzantines and

Longobardi, often at war with each other. In this period of devastation has shone the work of St. Benedict, in the name of faith, saved the treasures of Latin culture in his monasteries and encouraged to continue cultivating the fields. Then followed the era of feudalism, in which is distinguished the Duke of Spoleto, who briefly proclaimed himself king of Italy. Much more suited to the free spirit of the glorious Umbrian came the age of Comunities and then that of the Lords. Shone, among other families, that of Monaldeschi in Orvieto, the Trinci in Foligno, and the Baglioni in Perugia. Unfortunately, the Lords, wanting to control, bloodied again towns and countryside. Here then is the rising voice of another great saint, Francis, the humble knight of poverty, who taught the world and Italy that
Happiness is not achieved with the desire of earthly goods, but with the divine law of love. The work of St. Francis was ideally continued by St. Clare of Assisi and St. Bonaventure of Bagnoregio, counted among the doctors of the Church, St. Anthony of Padua, with ascetic virtues and great powers of persuasion, from San Bernardino Siena, the famous preacher, from Santa Rita da Cascia. In the fourteenth and fifteenth century, cities, villages and castles they saw a wonderful flowering of art and culture. Perugino, teacher of Raphael and Pinturicchio, gave birth to a new school of painting. Started also the art of printing. Continuis wars made famous leaders emerge as Gattamelata (which was Narni), Braccio da Montone and Bartholomew
d'Alviano. After many years of relative independence in 1500, when Pope Paul III built the Rocca Paolina in Perugia, the region was absorbed by the Church and had always control of it, except in the short-Napoleonic period. During the Risorgimento the Umbrians rose against the Papal States in 1831, in 1848 and 1859, until it was occupied by Vittorio Emanuele, in 1860 and then joined the Kingdom of Italy. The long period papal had left its mark on the economic and social situation, which is still in the twentieth century only by small companies. In the thirties there was a development in the areas of food and mechanics, but it was an external intervention that failed to promote growth in all the region. The destruction of World War II aggravated the depletion of regional life, which in recent years have tried to cope with the development of small and medium industries and the exploitation of small towns.
 
Contacts : Mobile: +39 3283058808 Fax: +39 075812502 - Email: info@assisiguidaturistica.com |Privacy Policy| |Links|

Margherita Anchino - Via San Potente, n°6 - 06081 Assisi - Umbria - Italy   

© 2006 Margherita Anchino. All Rights Reserved